Lil Band o Gold, Swamp Pop & Soul

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by WOW Talks on 03 August 2011
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A forty-something man with grey hair and a paunch is trying his luck at swamp fishing. He waxes poetically about playing the saxophone and raising four children while working the rod and reel, and speaks of his life’s great love of music with a mixture of pride and humility.

Pat Breaux, featured in a documentary about swamp pop and part of the eight-piece group called Lil Band o Gold, embodies the trials and tribulations that cross the racial line of rhythm & blues and country. It is that same line that these white Louisianan music men are reviving with passion and finesse, in their sometimes rockabilly, always toe-tapping tunes.

Thanks to Lily Allen’s sublime choice in wedding music, the group added a gig at the 02 Shepherds Bush Empire to their British trip.

The show opened with a down-home documentary on swamp pop in general and Lil Band o Gold in their particulars, shining a light on this genre indigenous to the Acadiana region of south Louisiana.

A group of Cajun and black Creole teenagers got together in the 1950s and 1960s and started messing around on their instruments, combining influences from Zydeco, blues, New Orleans R&B as well as traditional Cajun and Creole sounds.

The love of life and music that has kept the likes of swamp pop legend Warren Storm looking so young for his seventy-odd years is present throughout the film, and once the curtain came up his soulful voice went beyond all expectation. The crowd hooted and hollered and had a right good old time.

If Warren is a father figure to the band, CC Adcock, on guitar and vocals, is the brooding and passionate older brother. His longish locks and boho beard adds a dose of fashion to the group, and his stage presence is positively electric.

Tunes such as I Don’t Wanna Know, about a man who has lost the love of his life, to Aint No Child No More, an accordion-driven cry out for a ‘grown-up love’. This is swamp pop, all grown up, and worth a serious listen. Don’t be surprised if you end up grabbing your grandma and dancin around the living room. You’ve been warned.